Contact us:

870.577.5071

jessie@whiteriverwaterkeeper.org

P.O. Box 744, Harrison, AR 72602

White River Waterkeeper is an Arkansas-based 501(c)3 non-profit organization that advocates for the White River, its watershed, and its communities. 

Jessie J. Green

Waterkeeper & Executive Director

MEET THE WATERKEEPER

Since childhood, Jessie Green has had a passion for waterways and the biota inhabiting them. While earning her B.S. in Biology (emphasis on Environmental Biology) from Arkansas State University, Jessie served as a field and lab technician researching freshwater mussels. Her M.S. in Biology (emphasis in Aquatic Ecology) from the University of Central Arkansas focused on effects of natural gas development on fishes of the Fayetteville Shale. 

 

As a former Senior Ecologist in the Office of Water Quality at Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ), Jessie gained invaluable knowledge and understanding of water quality issues affecting the state of Arkansas.  While at ADEQ, she focused on developing standard operating procedures for biological surveys, researching appropriate means of defining least-disturbed condition, study design for the development of numeric nutrient criteria, and providing environmental review of NPDES permit applications.

 

In her newly appointed position as the White River Waterkeeper, Jessie will work to protect and preserve the White River and its’ tributaries by combining her firsthand knowledge of aquatic ecology and the waterway with an unwavering commitment to the rights of the community and the rule of law.

 

The Waterkeeper movement’s mission and our mission is for swimmable, drinkable, fishable waterways worldwide. Our belief is that the best way to achieve this vision is through the Waterkeeper method of grassroots advocacy. Where waters and communities are protected by active Waterkeeper programs, Waterkeeper Alliance makes sure they never have to stand alone. Where waters lack protection, Waterkeepers advocate on their behalf, and for all communities whose right to healthy water is threatened.

 

The movement began in in the 1960's when recreational and commercial fishermen recognized that outspoken, citizen-led advocacy was the only way to ensure that laws were enforced to protect the Hudson River. They went after industrial polluters and demanded enforcement of regulations. Their success inspired efforts to protect other waterways, and in 1999, the Waterkeeper Alliance was established. Currently, there are more than 300 designated Waterkeepers protecting rivers, lakes and coastal waterways on six continents.

To learn more, visit waterkeeper.org.